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IEM Member Karen Christman Engineers a New Biomaterial Therapy for Treating Heart Attack

University of California, San Diego bioengineer Karen Christman's new injectable hydrogel, which is designed to repair damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack, has been licensed to San Diego-based startup Ventrix, Inc, which is planning the first human clinical trials of the technology. Christman is a co-founder of Ventrix.

In a 2013 study published in Science Translational Medicine, Christman reported the semi-solid, porous gel encourages cells to repopulate areas of damaged cardiac tissue and to preserve heart function. The hydrogel forms a...

Cell Art Exhibit at San Diego Airport features IEM Researchers' work

The image above, entitled "Nanointerface", shows neurons (brain cells) from the cortical region of a rat brain growing on nanowires -- tiny wires on the order of a billionth of a meter in diameter that interface with neural tissue.  The image, taken by Dr. Massoud Kraiche during his postdoctoral tenure in Professor Gabriel Silva's lab, was selected for display at the Cell Art Exhibit at the San Diego Airport in conjunction with Biocom.

These particular nanowires can be activated by light to stimulate photoreceptors in the retina. The work by Dr....

IEM Member Adah Almutairi’s lab discovers new light-triggered release mechanism

Researchers in the Center for Nanomedicine and Engineering (CNME) have introduced a new means of using light to control the activity of molecules that relies on the ability of water to absorb energy at a particular wavelength. This discovery represents a major innovation because only a handful of strategies for light-triggered release from nanoparticles have been reported. The mechanism, described in an article published March 31 in ACS Nano, employs near-infrared (NIR) light from a low-power laser to heat pockets of water trapped within...

IEM Member's Neuroengineering Research highlighted by Science Nation

IEM member Professor Gert Cauwenberghs and his colleagues study how brain activity results in movement. Their NSF sponsored work uses EEG, virtual reality and motion tracking to understand the brain dynamics of human motor control. Recently their work was covered by Science Nation, a video series commissioned by the National Science Foundation. 

The work has clinical and practical implications as well. By understanding how the brain works to produce movement and how learning affects the circuitry of the brain, new treatment...